Monday, May 22, 2017

Friends and social directors

It is common to lose some relationships after a stroke. Some friends cannot deal with the “new” friend. Some friends are there in the beginning, yet life goes on. The old adage “out of sight and out of mind” is pretty relevant.

For the survivor, recovery is every day. For friends, they need to move on. For a survivor, sometimes a sense of paranoia sets in.  Especially when friends do not contact a survivor for weeks at a time. Is it because I am different? Is it because my “new me” is uncomfortable to the “friend?”

Five years after my strokes, I seem to be dwelling on what I perceive to be the loss of friendships.  Is it me or is it their lives?

I was the organizer of my social group for years. I was the one who would say “Let’s have dinner” or “see a movie” or “let’s have a BBQ.” Since my strokes, the sense of isolation is more palpable than ever.  

I did a little experiment. I have some really close friends who I decided not to contact until they reached out to me. Some of those friends were so close before my strokes. After strokes, they were “there” but different which is common. They certainly were there after the strokes, but five years later? Not sure.

My experiment was NOT to contact them via text, calls, or emails. I do understand they might have a perception that they do not want to bother me. However, some of these key friends would know better.

Therefore, I did not contact them. No political or friend “things.” No “how have you been doing?”

The result of my almost 6 month experiment? Nothing. Even for a work issue, nothing.

Like I wrote, in the old days before my strokes, I am the social director. Today, I do not have the energy and the mental and physical capacity to be the one to initiate common courtesy.  I am tired of being the "one."

For some of those “friends,” they are on my “Favorite” list on my iPhone. It was for emergency but also they were some of my “favorite friends.”

The other night, I simply wanted to have a beer with a buddy. On Saturday, I wanted to have a burger and laugh with friends.

I had no one to call.

A neighbor had a party recently. We were not invited until it was obvious that we were outside doing yard work. Sheepish apologies ensued.

It is not just me. My wife has the misfortune to be married to me.

Stroke is NOT contagious.

Is my victim hood? I am too paranoid?  Losing friends after strokes is common. Here is an article about this issue:  http://www.strokenetwork.org/newsletter/articles/friends.htm

I do not know. Nevertheless, I am lonely. So. What do I do now? I do not know. My “favorite” list is diminishing in many ways.

1 comment:

Rebecca Dutton said...

I think the StrokeNet suggestion to accept rejection is a good one. I also feel lonely and am over-sensitive about being rejected because of my stroke. Your post has helped me remember that rejection is a part of everyone's life.